Coronavirus

Shocking TSA numbers show how coronavirus has destroyed the travel industry

The dramatic dip surpasses travel trends after 9/11 and the Great Recession.

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51.7%

How much airline travel decreased when comparing March 2020 to March 2019.

TSA

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27%

The decrease in passengers comparing the last five days of March to the first five days of April.

TSA

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118,302

How many passengers went through a TSA checkpoint on April 4 — a record low for the past 10 years. The same time last year, it sat at 2,011,715.

TSA

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95%

The decrease in passengers from the beginning of April 2019 to April 2020.

TSA

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There's usually a travel drop-off of about 15 percent from August to September. After 9/11, the numbers fell by 45.2 percent in 2001.

Bureau of Transportation

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Though The Great Recession lasted 18 months, it hit its zenith with the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers in September 2008. Air travel fell by 20 percent from August to September.

It was only an 8 percent decrease compared to 2007, but travel had finally started recovering from 9/11. The September 2007 numbers were up 4 percent from the year prior.

Bureau of Transportation

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The airline industry took about two years to fully rebound from The Great Recession and roughly four years to recover from 9/11.

The Great Recession dip came from widespread financial issues while the post-9/11 decline can largely be attributed to fear. COVID-19 manages to stir both of these factors together, coupled with necessary social distancing efforts — a recipe for disaster for airlines.

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