Design

These $200 electronic dice would make your tabletop game way flashier

But is it worth it?

Pixels

"Fancy" is one of the words you might think of when you look at Systemic Games' electronic dice. Dubbed the Pixels dice, this set lights up, can be customized depending on the color and vibe you want, and has already attracted at least 14,000 backers on Kickstarter.

Systemic Games

Arriving in the colors Onyx Black, Hematite Grey, Midnight Galaxy, and Aurora Sky, Pixels dice are far from ordinary. They carry LEDs and batteries but the manufacturer assures they're not dull and heavy. And despite having lights inside them, the waterproof dice won't break.

“We have dedicated a lot of time, design and testing to make sure they are as fair as possible. With a combination of small counterweights and precise attention to the finish of our edges, we’ve already made Pixels surprisingly well balanced. And of course we will continue to improve the balance before release.”

Systemic Games

Systemic Games

The company aims to release these ultra-glamorous dice in March 2022.

Systemic Games

It gets better.

What's even fancier about Pixels is that they are Bluetooth-enabled, which means you can sync the dice with an app and listen to sound effects, see numbers, and more on your smartphone. "We are already in talks with D&D Beyond, Roll20, Foundry, and a few others to integrate Pixels directly," Systemic Games says.

Systemic Games

The dice can be wirelessly charged and pack at least five hours of play through a single one-hour-long charge. Here’s how that works.

Systemic Games

Here’s the case that a set of Pixels dice comes in.

Systemic Games

A closer look.

Systemic Games

But is it worth the price tag?

As Polygon notes, a single D20 die will cost you $39. A set of eight dice and a To-Go case will cost you almost $200. For a single person, a $200 set of electronic dice sounds a bit much. Even with the knowledge that they're Bluetooth-friendly, can wirelessly charge, don’t damage in water, and spruce up your tabletop game. That said, if you're super into tabletop RPGs or perhaps a small business owner where in-house entertainment could do well with fancy dice for board games alongside drinks, this kind of addition doesn’t sound like a bad idea.

Systemic Games

Even if you don’t want to buy the Pixels, Systemic Games was gracious enough to share an in-depth look into how the dice came to be. Head over to Pixels Hackaday.io project page to see its previous prototypes. You might just learn how to make your own smart dice.

Systemic Games

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