Reviews

We tested one of the fastest electric scooters you can buy. It's terrifying.

With a top speed of 34 mph, the Ghost makes most other e-scooters look pedestrian.

Going fast is fun, just ask fighter pilots, or race car drivers, or Sonic the Hedgehog. But fast, for all its yucks, usually comes with a price — a little caveat we like to call...

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D A N G E R

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I myself am not much of a thrill seeker, which is why when I hopped on this e-scooter made by Canadian mobility company, Apollo, aptly dubbed the Ghost (now you see it, now you don’t), I was completely and wholly out of my element.

Ray Wong / Input
Ray Wong / Input
Ray Wong / Input

34 mph

Not your grandparent's Razer scooter.

39 miles

On its highest setting, the Ghost can get 39 miles on a single charge.

$1,499

The base model of Apollo's Ghost scooter costs about $1,500.

Apollo

In the broad spectrum of fast-moving vehicles, 34 mph might not set any world records, but if you’re unfamiliar with e-scooters, believe me when I say it feels a lot faster on a seat-less deck with 10-inch wheels than it does in a car. Simply put, Apollo’s Ghost really rips, which while jarring for me, means it’s actually doing its job.

The Ghost employs a dual-motor design, each with 800W of power, giving it a total of 1,600W altogether. While overall speed is obvious when you’re riding, the Ghost’s power is arguably most recognizable in its acceleration — a head-lurching 0 to 15 mph in three seconds.

This button activates both motors

If you feel like taking a slower ride, you can always use the Ghost’s command center to adjust your gears — gear one is the slowest while gear three will allow you to hit those ghostly top speeds.

Thankfully, the Ghost is fairly well equipped to not only hit high speeds, but to handle them once you really get moving.

The adjustable dual-spring suspension and wide deck make for a relatively cushy and smooth ride while the base model’s mechanical disc brakes succeed in decelerating without being too overbearing. If you’re really worried about decelerating on a dime, you can purchase an upgraded Ghost with full-on hydraulic brakes instead for $1,700.

As one might expect for a scooter of the Ghost’s spec, it’s got some heft to it. The whole thing weighs about 64 pounds, which isn’t unreasonable for scooters in the same class; you’re gonna wanna be riding this thing most of the time, not lugging it around.

As fun and functional as the Ghost is to ride, I did experience some hiccups. Directions for the fairly minor assembly required upon arrival weren’t exactly detailed, so it took some guess and check to assemble the stem and handlebars. Apollo is, however, gracious enough to provide a large multi-size hex key if you don’t already have one.

Speaking of the stem: the Ghost’s design is meant to improve convenience — an adjustable metal collar can be tightened or loosened and slid upward, allowing riders to collapse the stem toward the deck and latch them together.

A collapsable stem is great for storage purposes (especially if you’re not exactly flush for space in your apartment), but the collar design, at least during my riding experience, tends to lead to a little wobble.

While riding, I found myself having to tighten the collar and ensure the Ghost’s stem doesn’t collapse mid-journey — not exactly a concern you’d want weighing on your mind while cruising at nearly 35 mph.

That being said, even at $1,500, the Ghost still delivers a lot of perks for the value, especially when compared to other high-speed scooters in the same class, which can end up costing $2,000 or more.

For some people, particularly those looking for something more intermediate, the Ghost will almost surely be way too much. Between its size, speed, and overall footprint, it’s not exactly something you want to fold and unfold on a regular basis.

That being said, if you’re a hardcore urban commuter looking for something sturdy and fast to sub in for public transit or even a car, the Ghost could be a little slice of heaven.