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Mercedes-Benz shows off its humongous display, the 'Hyperscreen'

The 56-inch "Hyperscreen" will find its way into cars starting this year.

Infotainments screens have gotten bigger and bigger over time, growing to a standard acceptable size that many might consider gratuitous. Safe to say, designers and engineers at Mercedes-Benz' are decidedly not many people.

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Presenting: the "Hyperscreen" from Mercedes-Benz.

The automotive giant recently took the wraps off of what it's calling the "Hyperscreen" – a massive 56-inch display that is slated to debut in a Mercedes-made car this year.

This display, which extends across the entirety of the dashboard, will be included in the EQS electric sedan later this year and will act as a centerpiece for the company's next-gen infotainment systems.

Although this massive screen is pretty extra, the Hyperscreen does seem like a well-designed piece of hardware. The screen, which is actually multiple displays housed under a seamless piece of anti-reflective Gorilla Glass, uses OLED technology and can auto-adjust brightness depending on time-of-day. It also comes with haptic feedback so you .

One of the most interesting aspects will be a an AI assistant that is designed to summon features you use based on time or location. For instance, the AI might suggest calling a frequent contact on the way home from work, or raise or lower your car depending on location.

That assistant will also adjust its recommendations depending on who is driving the car by using a profile system that saves and remembers different users' preferences

"All... suggestions are linked to the user’s profile. If someone else drives the EQS on a Tuesday evening, this recommendation would not be made – or another one is made, depending on the preferences of the other user."

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This AI recommendation system is also critical to mitigating any possible distractions that may arise form having a giant screen in front of your face while driving. Mercedes says the ability to suggest feature automatically will help avoid having to navigate various menus while in transit.

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Whether drivers will actually want a screen this size as opposed to a more analogue approach remains to be seen, but here's to hoping bigger is better.

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