Tap Stories

Steelseries’ water-resistant keyboard survives the deadliest spills

Steelseries’ Apex 3 TKL will make sure you aren’t crying over a glass of spilled milk — or any other liquids, for that matter.

Reviews

5 things that suggest the Apple Car is dead

There's reason to believe Apple's automotive hopes might be hitting a dead end.

Tech

How to dress like fashion king Evan Mock for under $100

Mock models for Louis Vuitton, skateboards in Nike SB Dunks, and runs errands in Prada. You can get the same look — but for way less.

Style

These are the absolute best Halloween sneakers dropping this year

You have no shortage of options to celebrate the holiday.

Style

Samsung just made Z Flip 3 colors a lot more customizable

A "Bespoke" edition lets you mix and match different colored frames and shells.

Design

Huge leak shows off Beats Fit Pro earbuds

Apple might not be done announcing new products for the holiday season.

Tech

Here’s all the next-gen gaming gear Razer just announced

This year’s RazerCon was packed with new and updated products ranging from next-gen PC hardware to headsets with built-in haptics.

Tech

Volcon's fat tire e-motorcycle hype explained in 5 key specs

Relative to competitors, the Grunt is a reasonably priced electric motorbike for ripping on backroads.

Tech

Macbook Pro 13 vs. MacBook Pro 14: What's different?

The new and improved MacBook Pros are here, and they’re a major upgrade from last year’s model.

Guides

'Pokémon Arceus' goes 'Blair Witch Project' in new trailer

"Is that a Growlithe? ... No, a Vulpix ... No not that either."

Catch-Em-All

Apple's powerful new M1 chips explained in 5 key stats

The M1 Pro and M1 Max are poised to bring a lot more power to Apple's new MacBook Pros.

Tech

The best accessories for the Nintendo Switch OLED

If you upgraded your console, you’ll want to upgrade your gear too.

Guides

AirPods 3 vs. AirPods Pro: Is it worth the upgrade?

Here's how Apple's newest buds stack up against the AirPods Pro.

Guides

These are the 6 biggest camera upgrades to Google's Pixel 6

An improved sensor, software, and more lens options means the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro take better photos all around.

Tech

Here's the first look at One Plus' Harry Potter-themed smartwatch

One Plus hopes your Harry Potter fandom will compel you to buy its new themed smartwatch.

Tech

These ports make Apple's new MacBook Pros a lot more convenient

I think we speak for everyone when we say: “Death to the dongle.”

Tech

Tidy

Marie Kondo’s tidying credo is helping me understand my neurodivergence

The guru's new game Spark Joy is... sparking joy.

IGV

Tech

Twitter has no clue why its algorithms amplify right-leaning content

But, yeah, the algorithms are definitely boosting conservative politicians and media outlets.

ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images

Twitter’s algorithms are disproportionately boosting right-leaning news outlets and conservative content, a new study by the company finds. And Twitter doesn’t really know why.

The social media giant published a blog post about its findings late last week, co-authored by Rumman Chowdury, director of software engineering, and Luca Belli, a staff machine learning researcher.

“We believe it’s critical to study the effects of machine learning (ML) on the public conversation and share our findings publicly,” the pair writes. “This effort is part of our ongoing work to look at algorithms across a range of topics.”

The study in question is a deep analysis of how Twitter’s algorithms treat political content. It covered politicians’ tweets from seven countries — Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Spain, the U.K., and the U.S. — along with political content from news outlets in these countries.

Twitter was able to draw some conclusions from the data collected, but more impressive is its willingness to admit so openly that it has lots left to learn.

When it comes to resurrections of ailing video game franchises, the 2013 Tomb Raider reboot is one of the better ones. It successfully took the innovative (but clunky) platforming and tank controls of the original series and translated them to a more cinematic blueprint, of the kind first established by the Uncharted series. However, as part of the series' 25th anniversary celebration, publisher Square Enix has revealed some test footage that shows that the reboot could've gone in an entirely different direction.

On the official Tomb Raider YouTube page, you can check out three videos that show off what the 2013 game might've been. In its early development, the project was apparently called Tomb Raider: Ascension, and while it seems to feature the same remote island setting as the final game, the particulars are pretty different. In a lengthy compilation of early gameplay footage, we see series protagonist Lara Croft ride a horse, muck around in a scary tomb, and battle some monsters that wouldn't look out of place in Bloodborne.

Reviews

Steelseries’ water-resistant keyboard survives the deadliest spills

Steelseries’ Apex 3 TKL will make sure you aren’t crying over a glass of spilled milk — or any other liquids, for that matter.

TAP

Memes

New study confirms most people prefer memes to the plague

New research on COVID-19 coping methods published by the American Psychological Association contains somewhat predictable results.

Andrew Paul / Shutterstock / Input

A new study published in the scientific journal Psychology of Popular Media details the effects memes can have on a person’s ability to cope with the stress of a deadly, seemingly never-ending pandemic — and wouldn’t you know it? It turns out that staring at inane images of babies and kittens is much more enjoyable and calming than ruminating on COVID-19’s societal damage.

"As the pandemic kept dragging on, it became more and more interesting to me how people were using social media, and memes in particular, as a way to think about the pandemic," said lead author, Jessica Gall Myrick, Ph.D., in a press release, adding that the team “found that viewing just three memes can help people cope with the stress of living during a global pandemic."

Water, meanwhile, remains wet.

Tech

iOS 15.1 is now out with fix for iPhone 13 Pro’s annoying auto macro mode

Apple just released iOS 15.1 with features like ProRes video. Most importantly, there's a setting to turn auto macro off on iPhone 13 Pro and 13 Pro Max.

Raymond Wong / Input

It’s been 34 days since we published our iPhone 13 Pro / 13 Pro Max review. I loved everything about the iPhone 13 Pros except for one thing: the camera’s automatic macro mode.

The automatic camera switching ruined the iPhone 13 Pro’s shooting experience in my opinion. A month ago, Apple said: “A new setting will be added in a software update this fall to turn off automatic camera switching when shooting at close distances for macro photography and video.”

Apple just pushed out iOS 15.1 and — would you look at that! — there’s a new setting (Settings > Camera > Auto Macro) that lets you turn the annoying automatic macro/camera switching off.

Hallejujah! Screenshot: Raymond Wong / Input

With the software fix, the iPhone 13 Pro / 13 Pro Max are perfect. Just perfect. If you’ve been waiting for this as I have, I can now recommend Apple’s best iPhone.