Gaming

You can update Control on PS5 and Xbox Series X if you're willing to pay again

Fans are decidedly and understandably pissed.

A screenshot from the game Control in which the protagonist, armed with a gun, is engaged in combat.
Remedy / Control

Remedy's Control is an addictive, visually stunning beast of a game. Gamers have hailed it an instant classic — they truly love it! But its publisher just burned through a lot of that goodwill with their recent announcement regarding the game's cross-gen compatibility.

The title is getting a brand new Ultimate Edition, which basically offers all updates and DLC in one sturdy package. Yes, everything released for the game since 2019. (For Steam users, it goes live on August 27 while the official date for Epic Games Store is September 10.)

The Ultimate Edition also comes packaged with an additional digital upgrade for the PS5 and the Xbox Series X — which seems, on its face, to be be a great idea! The problem? People who originally already bought the game won't have access to that upgrade unless they're in the mood to put some cash on the table. Specifically, $39.99.

Uh, why exactly? Clearly the publishers have anticipated this legitimate question from previous purchasers as the website for 505 Games states: "The free [Editor's note: lol] upgrade path to Xbox Series X and PlayStation 5 version of Control is only available for Control Ultimate Edition." This sent a bunch of loyal gamers in a pretty understandable Twitter tailspin.

One word: Unfair — It's bizarre that 505 Games decided on this upgrade model. In the past, other third-party studios like Bethesda, Ubisoft, and CD Projekt Red have offered free updates to players who have already purchased their game (and, in this case, all of the additional DLC). So it's hard to see why anyone would be interested in buying the title and its updates an additional time.

The frustration is evident on Twitter with gamers calling it "an arbitrary gate," "not acceptable," how business decisions like this are why gamers don't "buy games anymore at launch," how some feel "furious" and "utterly disappointed," and that the announcement is "some bull." Just to reiterate, existing players already paid about $60 for the base game and another $25 for the season pass. On top of this, the studio wants them to spend an additional $40 to try out the next-gen treatment. That's $125. For one game.

Pointless paywall — Cross-gen game upgrades are best experienced when they're straightforward and for free. But Remedy's sort of announcement locks early adopters out of the community and ends up breeding disappointment in fans who have already forked out some cash to support a title. We've seen this happen with Xbox Smart Delivery and it generally feels like a betrayal.