Tech

Scooters aren’t your vibe? Well, Bird now has e-bikes.

The company synonymous with shared electric scooters is no longer just that.

Bird

Bird was one of the first companies to pioneer the concept of shared electric scooters that could be rented from an app. The company’s signature black and white scooters are now present on the streets of more than 250 cities globally, offering affordable and fun rides from point A to B.

The company has greater ambitions to be a general provider of micro-mobility transportation, however, and today announced Bird Bike.

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As you might suspect, Bird Bike is the company’s first shared electric bike.

Bird
Bird

Demand for e-bikes (and bikes in general) soared by nearly 200 percent during the pandemic as people wary of public transit considered new ways of getting around their cities.

Electric bikes add a motor to a traditional bike, giving riders an assist and allowing them to travel with greater confidence. But e-bikes can easily cost $1,000 or more, so Bird is coming in with rentals that will be more accessible.

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Cities around the globe already offer bike-sharing programs, some of which include e-bikes. But most are small, taxpayer-funded schemes.

They’re nowhere near as ubiquitous (or well funded) as Bird. By partnering with the company, cities can offer sharing programs that they don’t need to operate themselves.

Bird offers rentals starting at $1 to unlock a scooter and $0.15 per minute thereafter. In select markets, riders can pay for a subscription that gives them 100 rides per month. It’s unclear how much e-bike rentals will cost.

Bird

In terms of specs, the Bird Bike is pretty standard fare for an electric bike:

- Its motor is assisted, meaning riders pedal, and the motor kicks in to provide a boost.

- Top speed is 15 miles per hour, in line with Bird’s scooters.

- Range is roughly 56 miles on a charge.

- An adjustable seat and 26-inch pneumatic tires make for a comfortable ride.

Bird
Bird

Whatever you think of privatizing transportation, Bird and its rivals have been able to fill the gap in places where public transit is underfunded. They’re also a boon for cities trying to reduce congestion.

And companies including Bird like to emphasize that they’re eco-friendly, promising to reduce emissions released by private cars.

Bird Bike will arrive later this year, starting with North America, Italy, Spain, Germany, Ireland, and France.

Bird

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